Nursing
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What Kind Of Nursing Jobs Are There?

What Kind Of Nursing Jobs Are There?

Nursing is one of the fastest-growing professions in the United States, and it's one that spans many different disciplines. There are many nursing jobs available and it's those that we'll look at here, covering the required certifications, approximate salaries, and more for all of them. *

*All sources for these approximations are included at the bottom of this article.

Registered Nurse (RN)

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree
  • Certifications: State Nursing License
  • Median Salary: $75,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Residential Care Facilities and Hospitals

Registered nurses provide a wide spectrum of patient care and aim to educate both patients and the general public. The exact role of a registered nurse will depend on the field in which they work and there are many nursing careers available to individuals who have the necessary qualifications and certifications.

Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN)

  • Education: Master’s of Science
  • Certifications: APRN Certification
  • Median Salary: $117,670 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Clinics, Outpatient Centers, Hospitals

Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) are registered nurses who have met advanced clinical and educational requirements to deliver a high standard of care. They treat and diagnose illnesses and advise on a wide range of health issues.

Pediatric Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Certified Pediatric Nurse (CPN)
  • Median Salary: $117,670 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Hospitals, Clinics

A pediatric nurse specializes in providing care for children of all ages (from newborns to young adults) and is trained to give medical examinations, create treatment plans, administer treatments, and diagnose illnesses.

Oncology Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: 1,000 RN Training Hours
  • Median Salary: $73,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Cancer Treatment Centers and Hospitals

Oncology nurses are cancer specialists that deal with many aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. These nurses often work in hospitals but may also work in specialty clinics designed to treat cancer patients.

The demand for this nursing profession is increasing significantly and that will likely continue as the US population ages. Cancer is a disease that can affect people of all ages, but it's more common in older individuals.

Nurse Anesthetist

  • Education: Master’s of Science
  • Certifications: National Certification Exam (CNE) provided by the National Board of Certification and Recertification for Nurse Anesthetists 
  • Median Salary: $117,670 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Hospitals and Non-Clinical Settings

Nurse anesthetists are a type of Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) that work in clinical and non-clinical settings and typically earn a very high wage in comparison to other nursing professions.

Nurses in this profession are tasked with administering anesthesia and providing pre and post-anesthesia care for the patient. They are also trained in some emergency procedures and may provide pain management solutions.

Orthopedic Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Orthopedic Nurse Certification (ONC)
  • Median Salary: $117,670 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Rehabilitation Centers, Hospitals, Clinics

Orthopedic nurses deal with musculoskeletal diseases, disorders, and injuries, including everything from bone fractures to osteoporosis. They provide treatment for physical issues and also help patients with the management of musculoskeletal disorders.

Nurse Educator

  • Education: Master’s of Science, Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)
  • Certifications: Certification for Nurse Educators (CNE)
  • Where They Work: Hospitals, Clinics, and Academic Settings

The role of a Nurse Educator is to facilitate training and ensure that staff have the resources they need to learn and improve. A Nurse Educator may also develop programs designed to improve the efficiency and efficacy of patient care.

Nurse Manager

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Certified Nurse Manager and Leader (CNML) or Certified in Executive Nursing Practice (CENP)
  • Where They Work: Outpatient Facilities, Surgical Centers, Hospitals

A manager of nurses that typically assumes an admin role and often deals with the recruitment and management of nurses and nursing schedules.

Nurse Midwife

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: American College of Nurse Midwives Certification
  • Median Salary: $117,670 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Clinics and Hospitals

A nurse midwife tends to pregnant women and assists with labor and birth. They may also assist the expecting mother with pregnancy and help them to manage themselves and the baby once it is born.

Nurse Practitioner

  • Education: Master’s Degree or Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree (DNP)
  • Certifications: Relating to the area of care
  • Median Salary: $117,670 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Clinics and Hospitals

Nurse practitioners have more training than registered nurses and often assume a diagnostic role, while also offering treatments. They order tests, analyze results, and administer medications, among other treatments.

Critical Care Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Certification in Advanced Cardiac Life Support
  • Median Salary: $75,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Hospital and Intensive Care Units

A critical care registered nurse provides complex care to individuals with serious illnesses and can often be found in intensive care units.

Public Health Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Public Health Nursing Exam
  • Median Salary: $75,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Community Clinics and Hospitals

An advocate for public health who teaches communities about essential health information and covers topics such as treatment options and disease prevention. Public health nurses focus more on supporting large groups and communities than providing individual care.

Travel Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Dependent Upon Area of Specialization
  • Median Salary: $75,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Clinics and Hospitals

Travel nurses will literally travel from place to place, providing a broad spectrum of care to patients in many locations. In addition to the average salary quoted above, travel nurses may also receive additional funds to cover travel costs and accommodation costs.

Home Care Registered Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: BSN, ADN
  • Median Salary: $75,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Homes of Patients

A home care registered nurse is an RN who visits patient homes and provides one-on-one care, helping to prepare equipment, deliver support, educate patients on important health matters, change dressings, and provide other basic medical care.

Health Informatics Nurse Specialist

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science, Masters in Health Informatics
  • Certifications: ANCC Informatics Nursing Board Certification
  • Median Salary: $75,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Information Systems Departments

These types of nurses help to train staff, check and maintain hardware, and concern themselves more with the hardware and software side of the role.

Emergency Room Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN)
  • Median Salary: $75,330 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Hospitals

An ER nurse may be tasked with conducting examinations, monitoring the progress of patients, and performing triage. It's a job that can earn a very varied salary, with the actual amount dependent on the experience of the nurse and the location of the hospital.

Geriatric Nurse

  • Education: Bachelor's of Science or Associates Degree, RN License
  • Certifications: Certification in Geriatric Nursing
  • Median Salary: $117,670 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Clinics, Nursing Homes, Hospitals

Geriatric nurses help older patients with their basic care needs. The ultimate goal is to improve the patient's quality of life and this may include managing diseases and illnesses or helping them to recover from injury. Geriatric nursing staff can often be found in nursing homes and other clinical settings but may also provide assistance at the patient's home.

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

  • Education: An education program approved by the state
  • Certifications: Certificate in a CNA program
  • Median Salary: $30,830 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Care Facilities and Hospitals

A nursing assistant provides a basic level of care that can support the work of other healthcare professionals and improve quality of life for the patients. Their work may include taking blood pressure, checking temperature, washing and bathing, and helping the patients with rehabilitation.

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)

  • Education: High-school diploma/GED
  • Certifications: Certificate in an approved program
  • Median Salary: $48,820 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Where They Work: Care Facilities, Clinics, and Hospitals

An LPN provides basic care under the instruction of doctors and/or registered nurses. Their job may entail checking vital signs, taking blood/urine, dealing with patient concerns, and changing bandages.

Other Types of Nursing Jobs

  • Ambulatory Cure Nurse: An outpatient care nurse that provides an array of services in settings such as health centers, clinics, and other locations where patients are not required to stay overnight.
  • Burn Care Nurse: A nurse that deals with burns and is trained to provide care immediately after the incident and over the long term.
  • Camp Nurse: Works in day camps and residential caps and is skilled in assessing, managing, and dealing with a broad range of patients.
  • Cardiac Care Nurse: A nurse that specializes in providing care for patients with heart conditions, including those recovering from serious cardiac episodes.
  • Chief Nursing Office: A CNO will assume an executive role within a healthcare setting, overseeing and managing the nursing department.
  • Correctional Nurse: Performs an important role within a penitentiary. They deal with prisoner health complaints and disorders.
  • Cosmetic Nurse: Typically performs non-invasive treatments related to aesthetics, including fillers, chemical peels, and Botox injections. These nursing staff often work in private clinics and spas.
  • Cruise Nurses: A nurse that works on cruise ships and is required to assist the patients on the ship.
  • Dermatology Nurse: A nursing field that deals with skin disorders, ranging from acne to melanoma.
  • Fertility Nurse: One of the nursing specialties that deal with fertility, helping couples who are trying to conceive.
  • GI Nurses: A nurse that provides patient care relating to disorders and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Holistic Nurse: A registered nurse who typically adopts a more holistic approach and may use traditional and Eastern treatments, including acupuncture and meditation.
  • Hospice Nurse: A nurse that helps to make patients comfortable toward the end of their lives. They may monitor vital signs, administer medications, and ensure that personal hygiene is adequately maintained.
  • Infection Control Nurse: Specializes in preventing the spread of infectious diseases.
  • Military Nurse: A military nursing career that trains nurses to provide care in military hospitals.
  • Occupational Health Nurse: A type of nurse that deals with workplace issues and helps to make the workplace a safer environment.
  • Operating Room Nurses: All aspects of surgery are covered by this nursing profession.
  • Pain Management Nurse: A registered nurse that specializes in delivering pain relief to patients suffering from an illness or dealing with long-term disorders.
  • Psychiatric Nurse: An expert in mental health disorders, as well as substance abuse issues.
  • Radiology Nurse: Provides care for patients who undergo x-rays, MRIs, and CT scans.
  • School Nurse: A registered nurse that works in a school setting and provides a range of care solutions to the students.

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